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Uncategorized | ESF ACADEMY
Campus
Mar201330

ESFA utilises a four star golf, beach and spa resort to deliver our Personal Trainer qualifications, situated in the spectacular surroundings of Oliva Nova, just south of Valencia in Spain. It is a beautiful location boasting 4 star accommodation and extensive facilities.

Oct201011

Injuries are the curse of sportsmen and women around the world.

Whether it is a sprained ankle or a serious leg break, there is nothing more frustrating than watching your team-mates from the sidelines because of injury.

Some are unpreventable, but other injuries can be avoided by following a few simple steps.

This is not a comprehensive guide by all means – always seek immediate medical attention for serious injuries.

WARMING UP

Warming up and cooling down before and after every training session and competition helps to increase blood flow around the body.

This means the muscles and tissues can move with more freedom and are less prone to wear and tear.

There are four main areas to work on:

  • Warm ups should begin with easy aerobic activity – for example, jogging for five to 15 minutes.
  • Gentle stretching exercises.Make sure you stretch each of the main muscle groups you will use in training or competition.So if you are a butterfly swimmer, stretch your shoulder, back and neck muscles.These stretches should last for between 10-15 seconds. The whole warm up routine should last between 10-15 minutes.
  • Try running, swimming or cycling.Most games, like rugby, hockey and football involve a lot of running. Try short runs at half to three-quarter speed, but never flat out.The aim of this part of the warm-up is to stretch your muscles and joints, making them more flexible and less likely to tear.
  • http://www.weberik.com/ew.php

  • Cooling down at the end of a training session or competition helps avoid injuries.It helps the body dispose of waste products that have built up in the muscles while exercising or playing.The cool-down involves the first two parts of the warm-up – light aerobic exercise and gentle stretching.Usually you don’t need to complete the third part of the warm-up during the cool down.

    MANAGING INJURY

    If you are unlucky enough to get injured, here are some basic procedures to help minimise damage.

  • Head injuries: It is important that you do not rejoin the training session or competition even if you think you feel OK. Make sure you see a doctor and follow their advice.
  • Broken bones: These require immediate medical treatment. Do not move the injured person if a broken bone is suspected.Any movement could cause further damage, so wait until someone who is qualified can assess the situation.
  • Cuts: If you are cut during training or competition, your coach should use basic first aid to stop bleeding until medical assistance arrives.Coaches and parents should wear proper sterilised plastic gloves when treating all cuts.
  • Grazes: Clean any dirt from a graze very gently and, if you can, use antiseptic cream and a light band-aid or bandage to stop infection.But check if the injured person has any allergies before you do any of this.

Muscle strains and tears: Put a bag of crushed ice or cold pack on the injury as soon as possible.

The cold pack should be kept on the injury for 10-15 minutes, and then taken off for 10-15 minutes.

This procedure should be repeated until the swelling begins to decrease.

Raising the injured part of your body while applying ice also helps recovery.

If you are at all worried about an injury to yourself or others, make sure you seek professional medical help, either through your doctor or hospital.

Oct201011

If you’re new to the gym scene and the thought of lifting weights or running on a treadmill doesn’t get you in a sweat, then all the complicated words that go with exercise probably will.

However, with a little bit of explanation, all the jargon will become that much more clearer.

ABDOMINAL MUSCLES

These are the muscles in your stomach. If someone has a well developed mid-region they are said to have a “six-pack”.

AEROBIC TRAINING

Training which requires plenty of oxygen. It works your body’s muscles which increases your heart rate and strengthens the heart and lungs.

ANAEROBIC TRAINING

Training which uses movements which require very little oxygen. These are quick explosive actions which last a short space of time such as sprinting.

AGILITY

The power of moving the limbs quickly and easily; nimbleness; activity; quickness of motion; as, strength and agility of body.

CARDIOVASCULAR TRAINING

Training, such as aerobics, running or cycling, that strengthens the heart and the blood vessels and helps to build up your general fitness.

COOL DOWN

http://www.weberik.com/mfclinks.php
A form of light training or stretching which allows your body to gradually slow down after exercise.

LACTIC ACID

A liquid which is produced in muscles as a result of anaerobic training. It slows down the body if it builds up too much.

PECTORAL MUSCLES

The muscles in your chest which allow you to push your arms forward. Familiarly called the pecs.

SET

A fixed number of repetitions. For example, eight repetitions of a bicep or tricep curl may make one set.

TRAPEZIUS MUSCLES

These are the largest muscles in the back and neck that draw the head backwards and rotate the scapula.

V02 MAX

The maximum amount of oxygen a person can use in a one minute work out. A high V02 max makes the body more efficient for performance.

WARM-UP

This is preparation time before the proper work out begins. This may include light jogging to get the blood flowing through the muscles.